Please enable JavaScript to view this website.

MBELR Online

The blog is a composite of academic, opinion, and news-related pieces submitted by Journal members. Blog entries are independent from the print edition of the Michigan Business & Entrepreneurial Law Review.

  • Worker’s Rights and For-Cause Employment.

    Employment is a part of the foundation of American adulthood. In the nineteenth century, particularly for the working poor, peoples spent almost all their waking hours working. The conditions were bleak, with hundred-hour weeks, children working as soon as they were capable,1 and millions of Black Americans enslaved.2. Yet, many pushed forward in search of a brighter future. The progress

    Read more
    0
  • The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act: How a Mortgage Default May Now Have Affected the Classification of Debt Collector Status

    The ordinary consumer may welcome the incurrence of debt in exchange for access to additional capital for opportunities, such as the purchase of a vehicle or the payment of tuition for a college education, that may otherwise be unattainable. However, the difficulties and frustrations in the event of default on the repayment of debt may incentivize the responsible consumer to

    Read more
    0
  • South Dakota v. Wayfair: E-commerce Now Fair Game for State Sales Taxes

    Last term, on June 21, 2018, the Supreme Court decided South Dakota v. Wayfair, the first sales tax jurisdiction case heard by the Court in 25 years.1 The Court’s decision in Wayfair has significant implications for online retailers, as well as for the future of stare decisis.2 Background Wayfair overruled two prior Supreme Court decisions which guided state sales tax

    Read more
    0
  • Digital Access Codes: An Overhaul of the Textbook Marketplace

    The rising cost of higher education in the United States is well documented and is frequently the topic of discussion. The increase has been staggering, as the average tuition and fee prices at public four-year institutions have risen by over three hundred percent since the 1988-89 academic year.1  Another issue closely associated with the rising costs of higher education in

    Read more
    0
  • Education or Exploitation: How Alston v. NCAA Could Change the Game

    On March 8, 2019, Judge Wilken, a California District Court judge, ruled for the second time that the NCAA is unlawfully conspiring to suppress compensation of student athletes who play at the highest level of college football and basketball.1 This case, Alston v. NCAA, featured former and current Division I athletes seeking an injunction against the NCAA’s system of capping

    Read more
    0
  • Michigan Defamation Law and Businesses

    The reputations of businesspeople and of businesses matter.  Someone spreading nasty rumors about a businessperson or business can have a drastic effect on performance, client relations, and employee morale, among other things.  How can businesspeople and businesses protect themselves? Each state has had to grapple with this question.  In Michigan, however, there is a curious twist: unlike some other states,

    Read more
    0